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  • Beyond Closed Eyes: Brain Surgery, a Violinist and Her Music

    February 21, 2020 by

    Dagmar Turner, 53, played the violin during an operation on Jan. 31 at King’s College Hospital in London to help prevent damage that would affect her talent. Dagmar Turner learned of her tumor after a seizure at a symphony. Her one concern was her motor skills and her music. An accomplished neurosurgeon knew he had… Read more

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  • Great Power of Strong Feelings That Will Uplift or Dispirit You

    April 5, 2020 by

    Even a faint glimmering of love changes the way a person feels. The coming day seems brighter, any gloom is relieved with the warmth of sincere affection. With love in your heart you can bravely elbow your way through the thickest of the life troubles. On looking intently forward, the future seems hopeful with this rejuvenating feeling inside.

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  • Discover the Things That Push You Forward and Make You Rise Faster Than the Nature

    April 3, 2020 by

    The life with no challenges is fatal to a striving for the better human nature. It should be like the turbulent see that hurries you along. Sometimes lands gently, occasionally, dashes you on a beautiful coast or a piece of a rock. And the force of this fall may determine your future success in life.

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  • A Revolutionary in Life and Science: Waldemar Haffkine Developed Breakthrough Vaccines and Rescued the Mankind

    April 2, 2020 by

    Bacteriologist Waldemar Haffkine in the shortest time possible developed vaccines for cholera and plague. Waldemar Haffkine lived at a time when in the world deadly diseases stormed. Cholera and plague were killing by millions. Waldemar Mordecai Haffkine (1860-1930) by 1892 created the first effective vaccine against cholera. He tested it on his own body and… Read more

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  • Give a Large License to Your Extravagance: 5 Ways to Let Everything About You Be Yours

    April 2, 2020 by

    Life may end up being a staged play, where one theatres an exciting play, inventing different rules and changing them on the go to satisfy their need to be like others; while others live in earnest struggling to protect their individuality.

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  • How to Furnish Your Children With Happy Memories That Last a Lifetime

    March 31, 2020 by

    A child’s nature is sensitive to every little prick of family life. The only trusty guides kids have are their parents. The scornful reproaches from the best loving people are the most painful and tend to shut the little creatures in.

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  • The Deepest Dive Ever: The Mariana Trench to the East of the Mariana Islands

    March 31, 2020 by

    The Mariana Trench is 11,034 meters (36,201 feet) deep. If you place Mount Everest at the bottom of it, the peak would still be 2,133 meters (7,000 feet) below sea level. The Mariana Trench is a crescent-shaped trench in the Western Pacific. At the very bottom of it there are yellow and red rocky structures,… Read more

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  • My Schedule Is Happiness: How Positive Thinking Boosts Your Health and Improves Your Life

    March 29, 2020 by

    People often live with the brow of an optimist above and the jaw of a pessimist below. To make one dominate another is to create real value in life. A positive approach to everything one does helps to build a skill set that makes a smile last a lifetime. Whereas, one sardonic smile can bring gloom that blankets everything around.

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  • The World’s Best Caves: Kentucky Is an Underrated State

    March 29, 2020 by

    Kentucky is a destination of immense interest because of over 400 miles of explored caverns and passages. Kentucky’s Mammoth Cave National Park has a lot of offer to every visitor. About 80 square miles and more than 365 miles of the five-level cave system with new caves are continually being discovered. Mammoth is the world’s… Read more

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  • Praise the Virus Hunters: These Nurses and Doctors Are Doing Amazing Work

    March 28, 2020 by

    To stop infectious diseases like Coronavirus is hard, to overestimate the bravery of people who willingly fight on the frontlines of outbreaks is impossible. When a new epidemic is gaining speed, scientists have very little information about how a disease jumps from person to person, and how to protect yourself. The only option doctors and… Read more

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  • The World’s Most Ancient Continuously Inhabited City: Damascus’ Evidence of Settlement Goes 11,000 Years Back

    March 27, 2020 by

    Damascus, Syria is one of the oldest cities in the Middle East, the center of a flourishing craft industry. The city’s Arabic name derives from Dimashka, a word or pre-Semitic etymology, that suggests that the beginning of Damascus goes back to a time before recorded history. The city has about 125 monuments from different periods… Read more

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  • 7,100 Reasons to Visit the Philippines

    March 27, 2020 by

    The Archipelago is covering nearly 300,000 square kilometers and consists of 7,100 islands, some of them still unnamed. The Philippines is bounded by the Philippine Sea to the east, the Celebes Sea to the south, the Sulu Sea to the southwest, and the South China Sea to the west and north. Manila is the capital,… Read more

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  • Exploring the Country With Twice as Many Pyramids as Egypt

    March 27, 2020 by

    Sudan, a war-torn stretch of bland desert, has more pyramids than Egypt. More than 255 pyramids were built in Sudan during the ancient reign, compare it to Egypt’s 138. They were built by members of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient civilization that ruled areas along the Nile River. The Kushites started to build pyramids… Read more

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  • Diamond Dust or Subsun – a Brilliant White Spot Below the Horizon

    March 26, 2020 by

    A white, vertically elongated sport of light that arises through reflection by horizontal faces of ice crystals. This optical phenomenon is known as an undersun. It can be seen within clouds or haze when observed from above. Numerous tiny ice crystals suspend in the atmosphere and the Sun’s light is reflected off of them. As… Read more

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  • Sea Without Shores & Coastline: The Sargasso Sea Is the Only One of Such Kind on the Earth

    March 26, 2020 by

    The Sargasso Sea in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean is a unique creation of nature. It is surrounded by ocean currents rather than shores. The sea is called after the floating golden-brown seaweed that covers the surface of it and known as Sargassum. In the midst of Gulf Stream on the west, North… Read more

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  • Iceland – a Home to the World’s Most Active Volcanoes – Grows 5 CM Every Year

    March 26, 2020 by

    Right now Iceland is growing, as it splits wider at the points where two tectonic plates meet. The eastern part of Iceland drifts to the east and the western part drifts to the west. Iceland, sitting atop the North Atlantic Ridge, faces a constant growth created by magma. The volcanic system has been extremely active… Read more

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  • The Sahara Desert Painted White With Snow: Snowstorms Blanket Rare Parts of the World

    March 24, 2020 by

    Snow visited this landscape in 1979, December 2016, and January 2018. In 2018 for the third time in 40 years Ain Sefra, a desert town in Algeria, experienced a substantial amount of snow. High pressures over Europe caused cold air to be pulled down into northern Africa and the Sahara Desert. Northern Africa, where the… Read more

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  • One of the Earliest Civilization in the World: Mohenjo Daro Is Destined to Be Buried Again

    March 24, 2020 by

    Archaeologists are trying to save the 5,000-year-old city in Pakistan by burying it. A Bronze Age city Mohenjo Daro (meaning “Mound of the Dead Men”) was discovered in the 1920s in what is now Sindh, Pakistan. The city was part of the Harappan civilization and was an advanced one with a sophisticated drainage system with… Read more

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  • Paralyzed Surgeon Operates from Stand-Up Wheelchair

    March 24, 2020 by

    Dr. Ted Rummel is fixing shoulders, wrists, elbows, feet, knees and ankles and patience are relieved from pain and suffering. The orthopedic surgeon Dr. Ted Rummel worked at Progress Wes HealthCare Center in O’Fallon, where he was performing six to eight surgeries each week. In 2010 Rummel started to feel back pain and numbness in… Read more

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  • Hyper-Realistic Sculptures: Sam Jinks Creates Unbelievable Art

    March 23, 2020 by

    Sam Jinks used to work in film and television special effects. Now he makes us remember our mortality. Sam Jinks uses silicone, fiberglass and human hair to create his stunning sculptures. He depicts people in various stages of their life. The first sculpture of an older woman and a child in a tight embrace commemorate… Read more

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  • Egyptian Mummy Portraits Found in Tombs

    March 22, 2020 by

    Egyptian portraits were carefully wrapped into the mummy bandages and placed in the outside of the cartonnage coffin over the head of the individual. These portraits were discovered in the 1880s. Painted on a wooden board, portraits proved to be indeed closely resembling the features of the dead people. It is possible to date some… Read more

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  • A Man With the Golden Arm: James Harrison Saved 2.4 Million Babies

    March 22, 2020 by

    An Australian blood donor, James Harrison (born 1936, Australia), donated blood every week for 60 years to make a life-saving medication, given to moms whose blood is at risk of attacking their unborn babies. Harrison had major chest surgery when he was just 14. He needed blood donations to save his life and after that… Read more

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  • Finland Tops the 2020 World Happiness Report

    March 22, 2020 by

    The UN’s annual World Happiness Report ranks over 156 countries and Finland is named the happiest for the third year in a row. Since 2012, when the first World Happiness Report was published, four different countries have taken the top positions: 2012, 2013, and 2016 – Denmark, 2015 – Switzerland, 2017 – Norway, and 2018,… Read more

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  • A Unique Geological Phenomenon: Kerið Is an Icelandic Crater Lake

    March 22, 2020 by

    In the south of Iceland, a day trip from Reykjavik, there is a 3,000-year-old volcanic crater with unique volcanic rocks. This shallow lake is within the easy hiking trail and visitors can get a closer view of it. The Kerid Crater Hike is a magical experience. The opaque aquamarine shade of blue water is a… Read more

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  • Goats Help Poor Women Gain Financial Independence

    March 21, 2020 by

    A team of health workers trains women from the poorest areas of India to raise healthier goats. Goat nurses or “pashu sakhis” (friends of the animals) fight the lack of access to veterinary services in India with the help of a program called Project Mesha launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Goat nurses… Read more

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  • India Fully Transitions to Electric Vehicles: Climate Justice Was Demanded in Delhi

    March 21, 2020 by

    Delhi is one of the most polluted cities in the world and Indian leaders stepping up to make a change. Millions of people demand eco-friendly transformation – reduce tailpipe emissions from urban transportation. According to the International Council for Clean Transportation, about 74,000 premature deaths were the result of air pollution from transportation tailpipe emissions… Read more

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  • 15lbs Gold Coin Worth £129,990 Commemorates the 25th James Bond Film

    March 21, 2020 by

    A one-of-a-kind coin, with an Aston Martin DB5 engraved on it, is the largest in size and value produced by the Royal Mint. The coin features all symbolical identifications of the famous film: the Aston Martin has a famous BMT 216 A number plate, and the world-known ‘007’ is emphasized by a gun barrel. During… Read more

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  • A Father With 470 Daughters: Mahesh Savani Adopted the Girls and Paid for Their Weddings

    March 20, 2020 by

    Mahesh Savani from Bhavnagar, Gujarat, is a successful businessman and a well-known humanitarian. He bears the wedding expenses for more than 470 fatherless girls.  Mahesh Savani has interests in diamond trading, real estate and education. He lost his brother right at the time of his nieces’ wedding. Mahesh performed all the duties of a father… Read more

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  • Twin Sisters Who Look Nothing Alike: Fraternal Twins Are Radically Different

    March 20, 2020 by

    Maria and Lucy Aylmer are twin sisters, but most people don’t believe they are.  The girls live in Gloucester, UK with their father Vince, Caucasian, and mother Donna, half-Jamaican.  Maria has dark hair, dark eyes and skin tone similar to her mother’s. Her sister Lucy is a red haired, blue eyed, and extremely fair skinned… Read more

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  • Watchful Eyes of Drones Keep Protecting Endangered Species Across the Globe

    March 20, 2020 by

    ‘Sky Rangers’ monitor protected wildlife areas in Africa and other countries, saving animals from eradication.  The World Wildlife Foundation launched the first project using drone technology in 2012 in an effort to save endangered rhinos in Africa and Asia.  Island Conservation, an organization specializing in preventing animal extinctions around the world, is using drones in… Read more

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  • A Father-Daughter Duo Is Fighting Child Mortality Rates in Bangladesh

    March 19, 2020 by

    Saha family, a professor of microbiology and his daughter of the same profession, works at the Child Health Research Foundation (CHRF) to battle child mortality around the globe.  In low-income countries child mortality is high. Dr. Samir Saha and his daughter Dr. Senjuti Saha are trying to reduce the gap in healthcare delivery between developing… Read more

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  • Mysterious Ice Age Architecture: 25,000 Year-Old Circle Built of the Bones of 60 Mammoths

    March 19, 2020 by

    A huge circular structure built with the bones of at least 60 wooly mammoths was found in Kostenki, Russia.  The 40-foot diameter building required a lot of time and effort to construct. The finding is located in the area of the Don River, a Paleolithic goldmine site. Mammoth-bone buildings are not new to archaeologists, but… Read more

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  • NASA’s Entire Media Library Is Free: Vast Collection Is Copyright Free to View and Use

    March 19, 2020 by

    Over 140,000 striking images across more than 60 collections, sounds, and videos in NASA’s media library is download free.  Browse the enormous gallery with amazing space images, missions, rocket launches, events at NASA, images of astronauts, the International Space Station, SpaceX launches, videos of stars, auroras, hurricanes, and other natural phenomena, etc. This is a… Read more

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  • Korg and Moog Offer Mobile Apps for Free: The Biggest Synthesizers Are Giving Away to Musicians

    March 19, 2020 by

    If you like to experiment with electronic music – this is for you – the Minimoog Model D synth app (for iPhone and iPad) is free now.  Korg, an electronic instrument company, offers freebies with timeline, which helps to occupy the time in a musical way. The iOs app is free until March 31 and… Read more

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  • Theater Lovers Rejoice: Online Broadway Plays and Musicals

    March 18, 2020 by

    Live recordings of original productions and film adaptations are available with streaming services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, and BroadwayHD.  Let us imagine that we go to shows, breathe in a theatrical air, and sit among glamorously dressed strangers. The lights go down and the play begins. Shrek the Musical (2013, Broadway). Starring Brian d’Arcy James,… Read more

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  • Elite Universities Offering Free Online Classes: Open Learning Initiative from 50+ Best Universities

    March 18, 2020 by

    Massive Open Online Courses are taken seriously nowadays. MOOCs enrich college education and promote a lifelong learning.  Elite colleges and universities like Harvard and Yale offer free online courses that inspire and inform students around the globe. These learning opportunities shape the future of higher education.  One can chose a class for fun and entertainment… Read more

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  • Carlo Urbani – a Hero Who Fought Coronavirus: He First Recognised Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)

    March 17, 2020 by

    Carlo Urbani (1956 – 2003), Castelplanio, Itali, treated diseases in Cambodia, Vietnam, and everywhere around the world and was first to identify SARS.  Urbani, an infectious disease expert with the World Health Organization, examined Johnny Chen, a Chinese-American businessman on Feb 28, 2003, with the symptoms of a suspected avian flu infection that turned out… Read more

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  • Japanese Newspaper Becomes a Blooming Flower When Planted

    March 17, 2020 by

    The most famous national newspaper in Japan is 100% sustainable and if planted, it blooms. 4.6 million copies are sold daily bringing over $700,000 in revenues.  The latest Japanese invention is called “Green Newspaper”. It is made of vegetable paper that can be planted after being read. “Green Newspaper” was invented by the publisher The… Read more

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  • Sweden’s Floating Libraries: Boats Are Bringing Books to Thousands Who Need Them

    March 17, 2020 by

    The library on the water comes to a Swedish island of Moja, a quiet, green place with about 200 residents.  For one week twice a year the Stockholm county library boat visits 23 islands in the Stockholm archipelago. Rotating staff or 3 or 4 librarians help residents to choose from 3,000 books. People can borrow… Read more

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  • World-Class Museums Offer Virtual Tours: A Way to See Famous Art Collections

    March 16, 2020 by

    Google’s Arts and Culture collection teamed up with over 500 museums and galleries around the world to offer a virtual tour for anyone and everyone. British Museum, London Discover objects from the Roman Cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, the Great Court, Egyptian mummies, hundreds of artifacts located in the heart of London. Guggenheim Museum, New… Read more

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  • Dinosaur Found in 99-Million-Year Old Amber: Bird-Like Skull Is the Smallest Ever Discovered

    March 16, 2020 by

    One can see the outline of a pristinely preserved small skull with a prominent eye socket, a dome-shaped crown of the head, a long snout and small teeth in a small piece of polished yellow amber. In a 99-million-year old amber from Myanmar the skull of Oculudentavis Khaungraae, one of the smallest newly described dinosaurs,… Read more

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  • First Known Humans Genetically Adapted to Diving: These ‘Sea Nomads’ Can Stay Deep Under Water

    March 14, 2020 by

    The Bajau, a group of nomadic people in the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia, can stay underwater for as long as 13 minutes at depth of around 230 feet.  These people spend up to 60 % of their working life underwater. They dive for food and searching for natural elements for crafts. They have a genetic… Read more

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  • Gardens on the Move: Singapore’s Public Buses Plant Greenery on Top of Their Roofs

    March 14, 2020 by

    The “Garden on the Move” is a part of a three-month study to see whether the temperature inside the buses can be lowered, this potentially will save on fuel used for air-conditioning.  The authorities decided to make an effort to combat the urban heat island effect by reducing temperature outdoors. Research shows that temperature can… Read more

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  • Compostable Banana Plates: Peruvian Group Launched Dishes Made of Banana Leaves

    March 14, 2020 by

    A project called “Bio Plant” was launched by a group of young Peruvians. Biodegradable plates reduce environmental pollution.  Naturally shed leaves are collected, pressure washed, scrubbed, sun-dried, compressed and sterilized to produce eco-friendly tableware.  Every banana leaf plate can completely degrade naturally within 2 months. The ones made of polystyrene take up to 500 years,… Read more

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  • Land Art Rises in the Saudi Arabia Desert: Government-Funded X Al Ula Show

    March 13, 2020 by

    The latest project, the result of collaboration with Desert X, created a land art installation area near the city of Al Ula. Desert X Al Ula has opened a six-week-specific installation of artworks, revealing a living museum to the public. The place is expected to draw 2 million tourists by 2035. Saudi Arabia is one… Read more

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  • The Creator of Duty Free Donated His Entire Fortune to Humanitarian Causes

    March 13, 2020 by

    Chuck Feeney, founder of Duty Free, during his lifetime gave to charity more than $ 8 billion. The money was spent on education, health, science in the United States, Vietnam, Australia, South Africa, Ireland, and Bermuda. Chuck Feeney became a billionaire through the company he co-founded, Duty Free Shoppers, back in the 1960s. He is… Read more

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  • Meditation Deals With Rowdiness in the Classroom: Violent School Students Changed Into Tolerant Kids

    March 13, 2020 by

    In Montevideo, Uruguay, teachers employ mindfulness to silence the noisy students. In March 2016 teachers of a school in Montevideo came out with the idea of how to build a culture of peaceful coexistence, prevent bullying, violence, and improve overall student performance. Students aged between 11 and 14 started to practice Falun Dafa’s (or Falun… Read more

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  • The World’s Most Beautiful Filming Locations: 6 Absolutely Stunning Places Will Make You Fall in Love at First Sight

    March 12, 2020 by

    Jaipur, India The abundance of color is everywhere in Jaipur – on buildings and on the bright saris. The buildings were painted in an orange-pink color in 1876 and remain the same to this day. Most of the filming of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011) took place in this city. Dubrovnik, Croatia Crystal clear… Read more

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  • Edible Coffee Cups: Air New Zealand Combats Waste

    March 12, 2020 by

    New Zealand’s national airline is promoting edible coffee cups to reduce the amount of waste onboard its planes. Local company Twiice makes ‘leak-proof’ cups from vanilla-flavored biscotti. The company is working on a new line of edible plates and dishes, which could also work for airlines. It may be a small change but it is… Read more

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  • Repave Roads With Recycled Plastic: The Perfect Recipe of Polymer Creates Stronger, Longer-Lasting Road

    March 11, 2020 by

    Countries, companies, and individuals are working to curb the plastic problem. The University of California at San Diego recently approved a road made with recycled plastic waste. Plastic-suffused asphalt is a cheaper alternative than traditional one. It repurposes plastic waste and reduces the amount of petroleum in asphalt. The process helps the country deal with… Read more

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  • Animal Bridges Around the World: Bridges for Bears and Tunnels for Tortoises

    March 11, 2020 by

    Wildlife under- and overpasses are remarkably effective for saving lives, both human and animal. Conservationists and architects get together to engineer animal bridges to reduce fatalities for both animals and humans. Ever-expanding roads cut animals off from the resources they need for survival. Engineers design the bridges to be natural-looking and to no frighten the… Read more

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